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Mock Exam 1_Q.42 [RHSS-209]

Mock Exam 1_Q.42 [RHSS-209]

Postby penguin7 » Sat Jan 08, 2022 12:35 pm

The question was:
'The ringing of the bell in this poem connotes:
A. A relief from boredom
B Freedom from the burdens of teaching
C. a signal of opportunity for the speaker to channel his noble efforts to a more rewarding endeavour
D...

The GS answer was C:
[Answer to this question can be deduced from the implied messages of following lines:

“I will not waste myself to embers for them, / Not all for them shall the fires of my life be hot” (Lines 17 – 18)

“I will keep / Some of my strength for myself” (Lines 20 - 21)]
---------------

Whilst I can kind of understand how the above quotes would relate to the first half of C, it is difficult for me to see how they directly relate to a "more rewarding endeavour". I would have thought Line 1, "When will the bell ring, and end this weariness?" more directly lends itself to answer choice A?
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Re: Mock Exam 1_Q.42 [RHSS-209]

Postby Benjalyn » Sat Jan 15, 2022 1:20 am

penguin7 wrote:The question was:
'The ringing of the bell in this poem connotes:
A. A relief from boredom
B Freedom from the burdens of teaching
C. a signal of opportunity for the speaker to channel his noble efforts to a more rewarding endeavour
D...

The GS answer was C:
[Answer to this question can be deduced from the implied messages of following lines:

“I will not waste myself to embers for them, / Not all for them shall the fires of my life be hot” (Lines 17 – 18)

“I will keep / Some of my strength for myself” (Lines 20 - 21)]
---------------

Whilst I can kind of understand how the above quotes would relate to the first half of C, it is difficult for me to see how they directly relate to a "more rewarding endeavour". I would have thought Line 1, "When will the bell ring, and end this weariness?" more directly lends itself to answer choice A?





The word “weariness” means extreme tiredness, or fatigue. Thus, the speaker is not saying that he is bored. This is why Answer A is incorrect.

The context and meaning of the poem must be taken into consideration in order to answer this question. Lines 12 to until the end illustrate the speaker's desire to channel his efforts. When the speaker proclaims “I will not waste myself to embers for them, / Not all for them shall the fires of my life be hot” (Lines 17-18), he is suggesting that he will not “waste” his efforts for those who are unworthy. Furthermore, the lines “I will keep / Some of my strength for myself” (Lines 20-21) tell us that the speaker is saving his “strength” for something. The ending is quite telling when he says: “for if I should sell / It's all for them, I should hate them - / - I will sit and wait for the bell” (Lines 21 - 23). The lines leading up to the closing statement tell us that the speaker does not feel his strength is well used. We know this is the case because he says that if he does this “for them” he “should hate them”. Thus, he “will sit and wait for the bell” until a more rewarding situation for him to use his “strength” arrives.


It is important to read the whole poem and understand the sentiment expressed up until the ringing of the bell. When the speaker announces “When will the bell ring, and end this weariness?” (Line 1), in the first line, we do not have context for his weariness. It is only until the end of the poem that we can understand his sentiments completely.
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